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DREAD MEETS PUNK ROCKERS UP TOWN
When Bob Marley sang his track "Punky Reggae Party", he wasn't just refering to a musical gathering. Oh yes, a well-known Reggae Band like Steel Pulse knew their cradle to be in the Punk-scene. And bands like the Clash recorded music in the Jamaican Channel One studio. 

There were nuff "cultural clashes" but there was this thing too, which Bob Marley simply called: "Rejected by Society, protected by His Majesty". During this period, between 1976-1984, there was this musical movement spearheaded by the ones he sang about. 

But behind the musical stage there were much more interesting things going on. And who knows it better than those who were in the fore-front of this movement?

Introducing Don Letts, who in his own words: "was a first generation british born black of Jamaican descent and allready well pissed off". Don Letts might very well be considered as the personification of the Punky Reggae Party. 

So it's not a foolish choice to let Don Letts select 16 crucial (DUB) Reggae tracks from the era in which he introduced this music to the punk generation. Heavy, heavy militant Rockers, almost all preceeded by a crucial jingle like Mikey Dread's "Dread At The Control". 

The selections come with some very, very interesting liner notes written by the man himself. This booklet contains the story of the Punky Reggae Party, and contains many anecdotes to illustrate the atmosphere.

How was Patti Smith's concert with Tappa Zukie and Don Letts in reality? What did Bob Marley think about Punk when he first saw it? How was Johnny Rotten's visit to Jamaica really? You'll know it after reading Don Letts' story.

Whenever Don Letts played his Dub and other Reggae for the Punk audience, they just wanted the riddim to continue all night long. They preferred it over their own Punk music, especially after consuming a few spliffs rather than a lot of alcohol. 

The music on this CD was exactly the kind of music that the Punks wanted him to play on. Crucial DUBS like Tappa Zukie's MPLA as mixed by Phillip Smart. Or the Congo's, from the legendary Black Ark Studio. 

A crucial selection, and a very interesting booklet. A document that can be considered the Sound Track of the Punky Reggae Generation. You'll only wish you were there...

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